John P. Ruehl

John P. Ruehl is an Australian-American journalist living in Washington, D.C. He is a contributing editor to Strategic Policy and a contributor to several other foreign affairs publications. He is currently finishing a book on Russia to be published in 2022.

India Proves Isolating Russia Isn’t Easy

U.S. pressure on India over its relationship with Russia has revealed the limitations of an “us versus them” foreign policy. But it has also reinforced negative perceptions of the West’s historical relations with India while highlighting the binding ties between Moscow and New Delhi.

Why Biden Can’t Woo the Middle East

Since the chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan last August and Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February, the White House has been desperate to showcase U.S. strength on the world stage. But the Biden administration has struggled to rally traditional Middle Eastern allies against Russia, raising questions over U.S. influence in the region.

What Would a Potential CSTO Intervention in Ukraine Look Like?

While Russia’s original and shifting objectives in Ukraine remain unclear, the Kremlin is increasingly wary of a publicized, drawn-out conflict. A potential intervention by its military alliance, the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO), could give Russia a diplomatic victory and an acceptable path to de-escalating its campaign if it can leverage its influence over member states effectively.

The War in Ukraine Is Sending Russia-China Relations in New Directions

While the Ukraine crisis may put some strain on the Chinese-Russian relationship, it has also spurred deeper collaboration between them. Based on a shared desire to undermine the United States’ global order, their constructive partnership will not only endure the blowback from the Ukrainian invasion but is likely to expand.

How Russia’s Frozen Conflicts Could Warm Up Along Its Sizable Borders

Russia’s ongoing offensive in Ukraine reveals the Kremlin’s increasing willingness to use military force to manipulate conflicts and destabilize Europe’s security order. The lingering presence of the Russian military across the former states of the Soviet Union will only entice the Kremlin further.

Why Is China Fanning the Flames of Ethnic Politics in the Balkans?

Recent national holiday celebrations in Bosnia and Herzegovina’s Republika Srpska were attended by Russian and Chinese officials, raising Western fears that independence is gaining traction as tensions with Moscow and Beijing intensify.

Why Xinjiang Has Been a Touchy Subject in China for Centuries

China’s increasing security measures in Xinjiang reflect its historical territorial vulnerability and concerns over internal stability. Balancing these with its international ambitions and foreign relations will be no easy feat.